Careem Pakistan Faces Backlash for Using Political Slogans As Promo Code

Careem Pakistan Political Slogans as Promo code

The ride-hailing app Careem Pakistan has used favorite election slogans in its promo codes and thus faced backlash for its political biasedness.

Careem Pakistan’s Promotion Gone Wrong

Twitterati is criticising Careem Pakistan for using the politically biased slogans for its promo codes. And, it seems that the ride-hailing app’s promotion tactic has gone wrong.

In the wake of recent Avenfield Reference Verdict, Careem came up with Mujhey Kyu Nikala promo code. While many users must have used this code to avail the discount on their rounds, many got offended for the company’s biasedness.

Twitterati Reaction on Careem’s Promo Codes

Given the use of the political slogan, Mujhey Kyu Nikala by Careem Twitter users who might not be Careem users but only competitors have come up with hashtag #BoycottCareemPakistan.

Those who trended this hashtagged not only slammed Careem Pakistan for showing partiality in General Elections 2018 but also criticized it for hurting the sentiments of people.

Here is what they had to say.

They say it is sensitive to come up with such slogans in a politically polarized country.

They didn’t only boycott Careem but also urged users to switch to their competitor, Uber.

Careem Explains Its Stance

While responding to the critics on social media, Careem also explained its motive. The company stated that it was neutral and just using all the political slogans as Promo Code in this election season rather than highlighting the specific one.

Apart from Mujhey Kyu Nikala, the ride-hailing app has used other slogans and phrases which are popular in Pakistan in a political context such as; Mere Aziz Hum Watno, Gaari A Nahi Rahi, Gaari A Gai Hai, Kal Bhi Promo Zinda Tha, Aj Bhi Promo Zinda Hai, etc.

But, it seems that users are losing their cool and not admitting the Careem Pakistan’s statement that it is politically neutral.

The backlash against Careem Pakistan for promoting its brand by exploiting the hype around General Election 2018 might be an attempt by its competitors. But, the question is should brands have the right to take sides of political parties just like the public?

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