Astronauts Answering Pakistani Kids from Space Is Best Thing on Twitter

Astronauts with Pakistani Kids

A Pakistani Twitter user Aimun shared that 6 kids from a school in Karachi needed questions of some critical answers from NASA and astronauts. The post mentioned that the kids were fascinated by the work of space agency and admired their adventurous pursuits. These kids who are probably from 4 grade must be enthusiastic and overjoyed to find that their questions were personally answered by astronauts.

The twitter handle kept sharing the post until a German Aerospace Center DLR caught it and tried to deliver the answers; apart from DLR, many astronauts shared these answers personally.

Astronauts Answering Pakistani Kids

The space center was flabbergasted by the stunning zeal in those kids. They felt grateful that they asked these questions to enhance their already daunting knowledge. First, they were able to answer Haniyah’s question about Jupiter’s diamond rain.

Center’s planetary geologist explained that ‘diamond rain’ is a theory about the activity of carbon, which is available in massive quantity inside Jupiter a planet with rings. As it is the largest planet, the pressure is very high from the top to its core. It sometimes causes the carbon to break up into atoms and molecules. The atoms then unite and form a crystal grid that looks like graphite or diamond, which are also carbon in pure form. The hollow surface of Jupiter makes it look like they are raining.

In the end, the geologist confirmed that this theory was based on physical and geochemical computer models. Nobody has yet observed this phenomenon in real-time.

This Cool Answer with Karachi Picture

Probably the coolest answer came from Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield who answered curious kid Rayyan who questioned if astronauts were scared of being lost. He told that they were not scared of being lost since Earth was nearby and they used stars to steer.

Chris also shared a picture of Karachi from space.

The center managed to get answers for two more questions asked by Alisha and Mahrukh respectively. The aerospace engineer answered both these questions.

Alisha asked about what type of fuel is used in a spaceship. At first, the Hupertz became confused because there are various types of spaceships. Someone even denote rockets and Unidentified Flying Objects (UFO) as spaceships. If latter is really a spaceship then it probably does not belong to humans. Which is why, the engineer also specified that the human spaceship consumes hypergolic propellant. He added that this fuel does not need ignition, it just ignites on contact.

Mahrukh was concerned about how astronauts feel when they blast off into space. Hupertz said that the shuttle gives a very nice ride after the first two minutes of ignition. He also described what happens in those two minutes. Sounded painful.

The Final Answer

Hupertz also answered the cute question asked by Rayyan who was wondering whether astronauts get scared that their shuttle might get lost in space. 

The engineer affirmed that they do get scared every second. Space is something where humans are not common so it is scary to explore such a place in man-made machines. However, the ground control crew constantly monitors every move of space travelers so they can prevent such a situation from happening.

The Moment Makes Twitter Worth It

Those who use this bird app regularly know that this place can be toxic since it is mostly about calling out each other and bashing people at times for no reason. Well. this interaction of Pakistani kids with astronauts is really something that makes Twitter a social media with some real goal-oriented communication. Kids who got answers from the professionals and those who are expert in their field must be excited that they got to somehow interact with those they admire and those they aspire to be one of them.

No doubt, Pakistanis are lauding this interaction that fulfills the quest of knowledge of these kids.

This is probably making everyone excited.

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